Lynn Hatter

News Director

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has been a member of the WFSU news team since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

peoriapublicradio.org

Florida lawmakers are pushing an education agenda that includes big changes to higher education and k-12 schools. Recess could become mandatory, tuition less expensive and Bright Futures expanded under proposals in the House and Senate.

Republican members of Florida’s Congressional Delegations have found themselves confronting angry constituents at recent town hall meetings. The move is part of a backlash from Democrats over the Presidential election. But how long will that anger last?

MarthaAnn Ackroyd loves the novel "A Land Remembered" and says it's worthwhile to protect Florida's undeveloped land.
Lynn Hatter / WFSU News

Florida’s cattle industry is nearly 500 years old. It’s part of what has made Florida the state it is today. Once a decade ranchers hop on their horses to reenact the long drives that allowed Floridians to export their main commodity: cattle. Lynn Hatter continues her reporting on what that drive, and the reunion rides, mean to the people who attend.

Former Tallahassee Representative Michelle Rehwinkel-Vasilinda has joined the Republican Party of Florida.

Lynn Hatter / WFSU News

Florida is known for its beaches, and the state and Mickey Mouse are often viewed as one and the same. But before there was Disney World, or South Beach, Florida was known for something else. It’s sprawling farms, citrus groves and ranches. Today, agriculture remains one of the state’s main economic drivers. And once a decade a group of gather to honor the state’s earliest commodity: cattle.

Dayton Cramer
The Florida Bar

A now-former Florida State University lawyer and a clerk for the House of Representatives have been arrested for crimes of solicitation related to juveniles. The back-to-back arrests come just days apart.

A view from the docks in the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

A special master’s ruling favoring Georgia in a water fight impacting the Apalachicola Bay is being sent to the U.S. Supreme Court. Now two of Florida’s U.S. representatives are trying to hammer out another solution that could address Apalachicola’s problems.

Lynn Hatter / WFSU News

Leon County’s Sabal Palm Elementary School is one of a handful statewide that’s been able to boost its school grade in recent years. Wednesday the school’s principal discussed before a Senate education committee how the school made the jump.

Boats rest on a dock in the Apalachicola Bay
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

A special master is recommending the U.S. Supreme Court rule against Florida in a decades-long fight over water use. The move is a big blow to the Big Bend’s Apalachicola Bay, which depends on water from the system.

Marianne Arbulu's Twitter page / Twitter

Full Story: The Jefferson County School system will be the state’s first charter district at the start of the next school year. The district's board approved the move Thursday, after state officials said any other plan is unlikely to be approved by the state board of education.

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