Lynn Hatter

News Director

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has been a member of the WFSU news team since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

WTSP

Santorum has branded himself as the  “Christian conservative” candidate over the course of his presidential bid, and during a prayer breakfast at Florida State University, he once again played up his conservative credentials, talking about the role of faith in government, education and politics.

“We will never have limited government, we will continue to be less free, unless we revitalize the institutions of faith and family in America. That’s the real message.”

On the second floor of the state Capitol building a sea of white coats swarm the halls. At different places in the lobby are tables offering bone density screenings, dermatological checks, cholesterol tabs—a mini medical center. The displays showcase some of the services that local pharmacies provide. But the agenda isn’t just to offer some free medical checkups—it’s also meant to promote an issue— getting vaccinated against potentially deadly diseases.

House education budget writers are proposing an extra 100-million dollars over the governor’s proposed billion-dollar education budget increase. Lynn Hatter reports the Senate took up both recommendation’s Thursday and are considering adding even more money to fund the state’s public schools.

 

House education budget writers are proposing an extra 100-million dollars over the governor’s proposed billion-dollar education budget increase. Lynn Hatter reports the Senate took up both recommendation’s Thursday and are considering adding even more money to fund the state’s public schools.

A bill to let teachers to grade parents has cleared its first committee in the House with a 10-3, party line vote. Lynn Hatter reports the bill’s sponsor calls it an attempt to get parents more involved in their children’s education.

As Florida’s economy continues to rebound from the recession, most of the new jobs being created are in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math, often called “STEM”.  Much of the workforce to fill those positions is trained in the state’s community colleges, and that’s true for the rest of the nation.  President Barack Obama highlighted the need for STEM-based workforce training in his State of the Union address, and as Lynn Hatter reports, his education secretary talked about it during a trip to Florida’s capital city on Wednesday.

A proposal to give parents a say in what to do with chronically failing schools has cleared its first stops in the House and Senate Tuesday. The bills are part of a nationwide movement to get parents more involved in public school systems. But as Lynn Hatter reports, the measures are being met with both support and opposition from the same parent groups they are trying to bring together.

Four members of the Florida A&M University marching band have been expelled from the university after being charged with misdemeanor hazing. Lynn Hatter reports the dismissals are the latest in the fallout from the death of one of the band’s drum majors back in November.

The four students charged with hazing pledges of a Florida A & M marching band club will have a chance to appeal their dismissal before a student judicial committee.

Florida Department of Education

The Florida Department of Education has released a new ranking scale that rates school districts from highest-to-lowest.  Lynn Hatter reports the rankings are coming under fire from school district superintendents who say it’s not a fair way to look at how well students are doing.

Florida’s unemployment rate has fallen slightly to just under 10-percent, the lowest it’s been in more than two-and-a-half years. Lynn Hatter reports the state’s Republican leaders have wasted no time in claiming credit for the job gains.

In a conference call with reporters Friday, Governor Rick Scott announced the state’s unemployment rate is now 9.9-percent, the lowest it’s been since April of 2009. Scott also took credit for the more than 141-thousand private sector jobs that have spung up since January of last year, saying the rate is a reflection of his policies.

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