Gov. Rick Scott, Senate President Joe Negron, House Speaker Richard Corcoran
State of Florida, Florida Senate, Florida House of Representatives

Top Issues of the 2017 Legislative Session

The Florida legislature will convene on Tuesday, March 7 for the start of its annual, 60-day session. The top priority is ironing out a state budget for the 2016-2017 fiscal year. But to get there, lawmakers will have to address dozens of other issues.

Read More
Tallahassee Democrat

At least 157,000 kids in Florida could lose food stamps under legislation moving in a Florida House committee Thursday.

Legislation by Frank White, R-Pensacola, sends Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program eligibility requirements back to pre-recession levels.

Florida Channel

Florida lawmakers may be looking at getting rid of the state’s so-called “Clean Hands” provision. That provision stops those with a prior felony record from automatically receiving compensation, even if they were wrongfully imprisoned for a new crime.

Rep. Randy Fine (R-Brevard Co.) reading his letter to Governor Rick Scott.
Nick Evans

Florida’s Governor and House leaders are at each other’s throats over funding for Enterprise Florida and Visit Florida.  Murmurs are growing louder lawmakers will need a special session to agree on a budget.  Both sides are digging in, and the battle lines are becoming clear in a recent letter.

Republican Governors Association's twitter

Governor Rick Scott is now the Vice Chairman of the Republican Governors Association.

Jason Tereska / WFSU News

Earlier this month, a U.S. Supreme Court-appointed lawyer ruled against Florida in its decades-long water war with Georgia. As the court prepares to make its final decision, lawmakers are going back to the legislative drawing board. WFSU News went to the coast to see what the ruling means for the struggling Apalachicola Bay and its world famous oysters.

American Legislative Exchange Council

With U.C. Berkley administrators taking heat for cancelling an appearance by conservative lightning rod Milos Yiannopoulous, the Goldwater Institute is pitching a “Campus Free Speech Act” in the Florida Legislature.

Tom Flanigan

Dozens of Tallahassee start-up businesses are being born at various incubators around town. But what happens to those businesses when they leave the incubator and strike out on their own for the first time?

MarthaAnn Ackroyd loves the novel "A Land Remembered" and says it's worthwhile to protect Florida's undeveloped land.
Lynn Hatter / WFSU News

Florida’s cattle industry is nearly 500 years old. It’s part of what has made Florida the state it is today. Once a decade ranchers hop on their horses to reenact the long drives that allowed Floridians to export their main commodity: cattle. Lynn Hatter continues her reporting on what that drive, and the reunion rides, mean to the people who attend.

beliefnet.com

House Speaker Richard Corcoran says America’s founding fathers would be squarely behind a so-called “preemption” proposal to strip local governments of their power to regulate businesses.

City of Tallahassee

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum says he’s “seriously considering” a run for governor. Gillum released a video on his Twitter feed Friday morning.

Pages

From NPR News

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mahershala Ali won the Academy Award for best supporting actor for his role in Moonlight. NPR's Kelly McEvers spoke to Ali in October about his experience working on the film, which won the Oscar for best picture. This story originally aired on Oct. 21, 2016 on All Things Considered.

One of the very first bills President Trump signed into law this month killed a Securities and Exchange Commission rule meant to promote transparency in countries riddled with corruption. Trump said getting rid of the rule, which required oil, gas and mining companies to disclose overseas royalties and other payments, would bring back jobs and save extraction companies many hours of paperwork and, potentially, hundreds of millions of dollars.

A 19-year-old white man accused of kicking a coat hanger up the rectum of a mentally disabled black teammate received no jail time at his sentencing on Friday.

Former high school football player John R. K. Howard entered a so-called "Alford plea," meaning he maintains his innocence while admitting a judge or jury would likely find him guilty. He was sentenced to probation and community service, and his conviction might be entirely dismissed at a later date.

More News

WFSU's Weekly Local Listener Call-In

Classical 24 Playlist

WFSQ Classical 24 playlist information at your fingertips!

Fresh Picked Prose

Young writers on the radio.

Listen to Capital Report

Topical State News Discussions